a blog about neo-agrarian problem solving, reclaiming the link between rustic and industrial.

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Bob Wyler's photography of Delaware County, Mid 20c

 handcuffed man with wife he just murdered
 cleaning the river
 1939 milk strike
confiscated from bootleggers


Bob Wyer (1908-1982) documented life in Delaware County as photojournalist and studio photographer from the early 1930s on through the 1970s. He photographed the mundane: graduating seniors, weddings, family portraits, funerals, etc — through the sensational: accidents, floods, strikes, murders scenes, etc.  In the late 1970s, Bob and his wife Billie Wyer generously donated their collection of over 150,000 negatives to the Delaware County Historical Association.
on exhibit at the DCHA

stump castles

Some fellas been busy chopping and stacking these loggy bits

Sunday, October 7, 2012

The Plant & Sing festival at Sylvester Manor

We took the run-a-bout out to Shelter Island to the Plant & Sing Fall Festival at Sylvester Manor.
Scyther,  Lau Gillam
 Musician, John Gawler from Maine
 Steve & Bennett
Edith Gawler & Brian Dolphin
video

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Freehand Burdock Wall Climbing Tractor Nightlight

We went over to Freehand Burdock's to pick up the nightlight he was building us for Joe Haske's birthday present. He was in his workshop down by the creek putting the finishing touches on it.
He really went all out using twin Motorola Mighty Midget dry electrolytic capacitors he pulled out of a 1965 Zenith B&W TV as well as a photovoltic "on at dusk off at dawn" system. It was topped off with a really nice  Whitall Tatum telegraph pole insulator covering a ruby red 7.5 watt bulb. He had it wired up  with a nice length of #18 gauge Westinghouse waffle iron cord with a snakey blue black braid.
Geez will he be surprised!

Saturday, May 12, 2012

portraits of the world famous GILBOA FOSSILS






An international research team has found evidence of the Earth's earliest forest trees, dating back 385 million years. Upright stumps of fossilized trees were uncovered after a flash flood in Gilboa, upstate New York, more than a century ago. However, until 2007, the crowns of the trees and overall morphology were unknown. These  have helped to determine that Eospermatopteris belongs to the Cladoxylopsida class, which were big vascular plants with spectacular morphology for their time. One reason scientists are so fascinated by these trees is that they were part of "afforestation," the original greening of the earth. That process had a major impact on the planet's climate, carbon cycling and, ultimately, what kinds of animals evolved in these ecosystems.

Dr Berry, of Cardiff's School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary Sciences, said: "This was also a significant moment in the history of the planet. 

Sunday, April 22, 2012

Monday, April 9, 2012

been gone, now back

Hey friends, found the camera and took some new photos




big pink moon the other night
but windy for spring.

hope we get some rain!

Sunday, April 8, 2012

mysterious handmade buildings

Here's some chicken shacks and other handmade buildings we found at an old place near Berne